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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
restrictions ends your virginity. you are the enemy. your thoughts? >> well, it's great that bob casey has come out for these things, but if all that happens at the end of the day is that we have a ban on a certain type of weapon or a certain type of magazine with a certain type of capacity, 100 bullets, let's say, we'll have failed here. you know, it's not just about the guns. it's how people get guns. what people have to do in order to get guns. we should be treating these more like automobile licenses. you should have to prove you know how to use these things. you should prove you understand the law around the use of guns and things like that. if we start talking about that, then we'll be realistic. i think what's happening now for a lot of these politicians is we've had this moment here in our culture which is pretty horrific, and they're running for the hills a little bit, running scared, so they're going to look for something they can do that is maybe better than nothing but largely cosmetic. just like the assault weapons ban was largely cosmetic. >> give me a ron reagan gun bill. >> a ro
by bob casey. >> he's not the only one. joe manchin, the senator from west virginia, on monday was saying this has changed his thinking. of course, these are two democrats -- >> but manchin hasn't said he will vote for these two bills. bobby casey said he will. it's different to have conversations, another to make a commitment. >> i think there will be more and more lawmakers who will follow what casey has done. i don't think he's the only one, and i think we'll start seeing some republicans -- >> it's the toughest case. let me go to ron reagan. i know pennsylvania defeated years ago joe clark, a great liberal senator, on this issue. first guy i ever voted for actually. now it's back. i know the people on the gun side of the argument, i know them closely. they will be out there vigilantly looking for any traitor they find, anybody who dares to vote for any kind of restriction, and any restrictions ends your virginity. you are the enemy. your thoughts? >> well, it's great that bob casey has come out for these things, but if all that happens at the end of the day is that we have a ban on a
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. time to wake up, everyone, as you take a live look at new york city. welcome back to "morning joe." back with us on set we have donny deutsch, mark mckinnon, and richard haass. >> let's start -- there's so much to talk about but, richard, let's start in egypt. absolutely fascinating. i think a lot of people across the world were so heartened by the democratic, we thought, perhaps uprising that was going on in egypt. certainly we all knew to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally, and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majorityism. people like morsi win elections but winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern. the question is whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he di
's a question, though, willie, whether you want the job or not. >> right. >> i asked bob riley, i've said this 1,000 times, it seems extraordinarily important if you're a union member in the northeast, and like me, you want your factories running again. i asked bob riley, i don't understand, why did mercedes go to tuscaloosa county, alabama, instead of filling up the factories in connecticut? 15 minutes away from yale. or in rhode island. 20 minutes away from brown. i mean, right by some of the most highly trained, brilliant minds in the world. that's easy. the work force rules are so insane there, there's no way that mercedes or bmw or airbus would ever dream of going to those states. do you want the jobs or do you not want the jobs? >> and that plays out all over the south in harold's home state of tennessee, auto plant comes back, you get a bunch of jobs but at a very low wage. so the question is do you want to lower ourselves to the global standard of wages so that you have many more jobs -- >> that's a better option. >> that question has to be answered -- >> stronger middle class in union s
on time ♪ >> that's bob herzog, the good morning cincinnati traffic guy. >> i like him. >> his friday dance party. sounds like we have a couple votes for bob. >> i love bob. i give him my vote. >> all right. click number two, you're a mean kitty, mr. grinch. >> i'm just trying to -- [ meowing ] >> the cat a little grumpy. it will not allow its owner to wrap presents. >> i have a cat just like that. >> do you? >> oh, yeah. >> lunges at you like that? >> everyone. the kids, the dogs. he's not nice. >> finally, a heartwarming holiday moment. we showed you this this week. don loved his new fedora. then the big alabama fan found his real present. >> we going to the game! >> tears of joy. tickets to the bcs national championship game to watch his beloved alabama crimson tide take on notre dame. we talked to him on the phone the other day. said he'd never been to an alabama bowl game. he gets to go to with his son. win or lose, that's exciting. >> that's one where you want to watch the whole video. he's thrilled about his hat. he's like, i should have had this this morning. he's very thrille
to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will bring you a portion of the morning portion of the discussion at the foundation for defense of democracy. this segment and this panel discussion focused on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that
the tremendous service and career of bob morton. a 22-year veteran of the washington state legislature who recently announced that he was going to be retiring at the end of the year. he was first elected to the house in 1990 and then he was appointed to the senate where he currently represents the seventh district, including stevens, and parts of spokane county. he owned a small logging business and ran cattle while also preaching at his local church and serving the community. but bob is not just an outstanding legislator for eastern washington, he's also a close friend. a mentor and the reason that i got into politics and public service in the first place. as an elected official i've worked with him on countless issues and his advice and friendship has been invaluable. he's recognized for his leadership and knowledge, good forest management, no one knows western water law better than bob and he's participated in most of the negotiations over washington water law. bob and his wife linda have five children, 11 grandchildren and i know they're looking forward to spending more time with them
other informed. bob dole replaced howard baker as a speaker. he would do things on -- in secret. dole takes over baker as leader. but they kept baker informed. and -- they just work together and kept each other in touch of what the other was great to do. they still opposed each other at times. the did work together. they kept no secrets. >> i always like to talk about byrd and baker. they really did epitomize the great senate and the way things worked at that time. the first two chapters of my book are entitled "the grind" and "the natural." he was a most natural politician you could come across. if senators voted based on secret ballot, baker would have won. they had a remarkable capacity for doing that. there is one incident in my book where i describe senator byrd. senator byrd decides to crush two democrats. it is such an unusual act, it he gets the vice president in the chair and by a script that byrd has written, start ruling them out of order in a way that is quite contrary to the way the senate work. -- the way the senate works. there is a rebellion on the senate floor. everyo
continuing the bush tax cuts for under $500,000 a year. something they agree on. >> because of what bob's saying is they're worried some voters are going to look at that -- >> unaware of reality that they would confuse this week with next week in terms of the same results. >> governor norquist agrees with you. but some republicans especially in the house who are unwilling to make the plan "b" type deal. >> but in the end where do you think it's going to end up? $500,000? $600,000? >> it's going to be in the middle. closer to obama's $400,000. >> i think that's about right. sounds about like $400,000. >> which leaves out less than 2% of the people. >> absolutely. >> people say that's an average income. most people make about $40,000 a year. that's average. $40,000 and that's with three or four kids too. >> there's only a couple places in the country somebody would look at $400,000 and think it's extremely wealthy. >> even in washington, d.c. if you make $400,000 for a couple you're rich. >> this weekend the president's been a tough negotiator. as you said with republicans. i think he's b
that will be calculated, and quite frankly, in a more simplified form been standard tax law. host: professor bob kelly? guest: when i say chaos i am -- professor buckley? >> when i say chaos, i am referring to two things. the irs has done programming based on their being a patch enacted by the end of the year. most tax returns software has made the same calculated gamble. i agree that the government needs revenue. i do not think there is any question of that. if you just say that the amt is a good tax because it raises revenue, i do not argue on the notion that we need money, however is an extraordinarily arbitrary way of raising revenue. it raises revenue not from the super wealthy. the amt applies to few people making more than half of $1 million. it is counter-intuitive. if you are going to raise revenue, it should be as president obama has suggested, shared sacrifice, and that sacrifice has to come from people making more than half of $1 million. host: how do the very wealthy get out of paying the amt? guest: because of the rate structure. the rate between $200,000 and $500,000 are at least as hig
blumenthal and chris murphy. at 4:00, "face the nation." bob schieffer talks with governor molloy and paul vance. chuck schumer of new york and kay bailey, from texas. these are brought to you as a public service by the networks and c-span. the rearing begins at noon eastern. at 3:00, listened to them all on c-span radio. -- listen to them all on c-span radio. you can listen on your smart phone or online. caller: my inspiration was -- [video clip] >> my inspiration was the archives and documents about the cold war. talking about roosevelt, stalin, churchill, we know the main events from our point of view. i wanted to show it from a different angle, from the ground up, what did it feel like to be one of the people subjected to this system. how did people make choices in that system? how did they react? how did they behave? one of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonigh
senator bob kerry and a former staffer for pennsylvania governor ed rendell. ron is a former communications director to the house speaker, dennis hastert. good to see you both. >> good to sigh. >> gregg: donna, let's start with what the president was offering a. even democrats are criticizing him for demanding 150 billion in more spending. not less, including a $50 billion stimulus this next year. at a time when the focus perhaps should be on spending cuts, are those democrats right? >> well, i'm hearing many more democrats resonating with the message that the president is delivering and that message is that he ran on and got elected on the basis of more taxes for the most wealthy americans. i think that there is a real danger for republicans in not really hearing that message. i've been impressed by the number of republicans that have made positive indications that more revenue could be forth coming, even in the form of tax increases on the most wealthy americans. and i think that there is a little bit of danger i think for the republican party as they redefine themselves as
to the top republicans since 1986, serving republican leader bob michael, newt gingrich, speaker hastert and john boehner and floor assistant as the general clerk for republican leader john rose and assist ant manager for the republican cloakroom. his experience has been invaluable to all of us who serve here in the house of representatives. jay is known for his vast knowledge of the rules, for his vast knowledge of the traditions and history and the procedures of the house of representatives. and he has been a teacher and a coach to so many members of the congress over the years and we're grateful to his dedication and that he has given this institution over the past 34 years. jay was born in santa barbara, california and graduated from westmont college. jay has a master's degree and pd in english literature. he and his wife have two grown sons, joel and jay. jay is a man of faith and he has his party in the right place. several years ago, he said politics must be secondary to faith and to life. ultimate answers don't lie in politic. no matter what we do or legislate, we won't solve the
's hard to see how they get momentum for this. >> interesting to see bob corcoran on "meet the press" tomorrow. perry, president obama took his message to pennsylvania on friday. he was appealing to the public. what does campaign strategy, if you will, what does that buy him? is this a campaign redundancy out there? >> no. what he's trying to say is, he's trying to show he has public support for his ideas. he's going to go out and campaign on them. a different approach, in 2011 they had all these behind the scenes meetings. they didn't really work at the end of the day. he and john boehner agreed to something. then the democrats didn't like it and the republicans really didn't like it. this time he's basically saying over and over again, i have a mandate from the election. i'm going to go out to the public and the polls show the majority of americans support tax increases. he's pressuring the republicans from the outside. he's trying to get people to go on twitter and call their congressmen and really urge them, push them that way. he's trying to win the deal from the outside of wash
morning. >> host: good morning, bob. >> caller: question. this is a topic that nobody wants to talk about. the interest-rate cut the interest that is paid on the national debt. presently most of our debt is under short term, under 1%. and it's manipulated, of course, by the federal reserve and treasury department. so it's going to go from say 250 billion interest payments up to 7%, the next several years. one half trillion dollars in interest annually on the national debt. wondering, how is that going to impact our military industrial complex in the near future when that actually comes to be? >> that clearly -- the ticking time bomb for any part of the federal government and probably because of. [indiscernible] , the state government. we are in a time of unusually low interest rates. it will continue for a time, but when they rise it is going to be a body blow to the national politics and the country because, as your caller was indicating, the jump from 1% to 7% is such a massive increase in taxes that the only thing i can think of is, can you say greece? >> host: what does it mean for th
we are heading in the same direction. thank you and have a wonderful new year. host: a tear from bob now in the democrat light. caller: thank you for letting me have a chance to speak. i am more optimistic -- i a more pessimistic than optimistic. i just do not think they will ever get together like they should. my one comment is when they start speaking about the cuts and the entitlements, the always a social security, medicare, medicaid. that is not the only entitlements. every government program that has a retirement benefit, a health-care benefit, those are entitlements, two, up to and including the entitlements for the congressman. let's be fair. when they start talking about entitlements and hold it to those three items, let's hold their feet to the fire and make them talk about entitlements for the other folks, too. host: appreciate you calling this morning. donna writes about this on twitter. if that to facebook here. -- back to you facebook here. budget showdown hits the keep week. that is of the front page reminding us of the deadline looming. it is a bloomberg story here ou
, one of our friends, peter johnson, jr. >> the andy williams show, the king family, the osmonds, bob hope, their christmas special, has nothing on "fox & friends." billy ray cyrus, paula deen, steve doocy challenging bill o'reilly, you guys. i mean, it's a fantastic show. i had a little bit of a preview. let's take a hook now what you'll see tonight and tomorrow. >> here is billy ray cyrus. >> made a lot of noise with that. >> queen of southern cuisine is laughing already. >> she's here to dish what christmas is like at her house. you gave us a real idea of what's happening. >> you look like you've been drinking egg nog. >> you have not aged at all. >> what do you make on christmas morning? >> christmas morning, casserole. >> oh, my gosh. scared me to death. can't waste the butter. ♪ all i want for christmas is a rock'n'roll electric guitar. ♪ i'm offering this simple prayer ♪ ♪ to kids from one to 92 >> youtube sensation. >> the piano guy. ♪ . >> ho, ho, ho! ho, ho, ho! merry christmas! ♪ to you ♪ . >> the back story, is i was supposed to do a duet with ashanti, but my
there's only one question that people want to know about "the five." . >> do you like bob beckel. >> how do you deal with-- >> how do you tolerate him. does ebl what he-- >> sometimes i can answer that. asked in kimberly and andrea can walk in those shoes and people ask is he crazy, a genius or funny, some people don't get him. like i really get him and start laughing before he finishes sentences. >> dave: well, don't overdeliver tonight at eight o'clock, if you want to follow the governor's advice. >> and big shoes to fill. >> juliet: thanks, dana. >> clayton: service women denied from fighting on the front line. is this an outdated measure and outright discrimination? we'll debate that next. >> juliet: so long dollar bill, hello coins? why lawmakers say it's time for more change. ♪ so, you actually reward people for staying with you? yep. the longer you stay with us, the more you save. and when you switch from another company to us, we even reward you for the time you spent there. genius. yeah, genius. you guys must have your own loyalty program, right? well, we have something. show
communicators." >> we just saw pennsylvania senator bob casey. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, haltin
reporter for good morning, cincinnati, bob herzog, holds dance party friday every week on the extra mile. nome to give traffic updates, but certainly to entertain as well. he's doing a good job. >> kelly: i sense someone is going to pick that up and run with it. >> juliet: oh, yeah. he's all over the internet. i followed him on twitter. all righty. so i'm not going to sing to this because it's a serious story. this is the storm we're talk being that killed 16 people so far. it's moving up into the canadian area. canceled 1,000 flights for people returning home for the holidays and a bunch more were delayed. let's go to maria molina live in the weather center. >> thankfully that storm is exiting the northeast, lingering snow showers across maine. we have yet again another storm system that we're tracking across the center of the country and it's kind of disorganized now. you have one area of it. that's just producing snow across parts of the midwest and the great lakes, and then another section of it that's producing rain in areas further south. the snowfall across wisconsin, northern par
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)